Advocate. Inform. Empower

Understanding My Body

Ovulation is your most fertile time. However, there are many components that factor in to when you ovulate. Tracking your basal temperature or the LH surge in your urine and getting a better understanding of your menstrual cycle as well as ovulation timing can help to improve your chances of getting pregnant.

The Female Reproductive System is a series of complex functions. However, every woman is different so it is important for you to understand how your body functions.

Not every woman has a 28 day cycle. Understanding how your cycle works will help you determine your most fertile days.

Your basal body temperature is your temperature at rest, usually first thing in the morning. Charting this temperature can help you understand your ovulatory patterns.

A woman is born with all of the eggs she will ever have. Each month a woman who is ovulating normally will drop one egg, this process is called ovulation.

Although a man’s reproductive system is not driven by hormones like the woman’s, it is far more complicated than one might suspect.

Conception is a complicated process. It all comes down to one egg and one sperm.

Progesterone is a natural female hormone. Called “the pregnancy hormone,” it is essential before and during pregnancy.

While many women think that getting pregnant will be no trouble, millions of women in South Africa struggle with infertility.

Comments (4)

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    Carmen Arnolds

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    Me and my husband have been struggling with infertility for +- 10 years.2 unsuccessful IUI, 2 unsuccessful operations – 1 to unblock my fellopian tubes(tubes to damaged) – 1 to remove my fellopian tubes, my tubes was damage because of hydrosalpinx (toxic fluid in my fellopian tubes).Than 2 unsuccessfully IVF. So after +- 10 years we are financially trying to recover. I guess we do not deserve to be parents because we do no have R 25000 to R50 000 cash for the cheapest IVF session .The fertility clinic take advantage of desperate couples, the sad thing their is no law protecting the infertility community, as the perception of infertility is a luxery not an illness.

    Reply

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      Saskia Williams

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      Carmen, I am sorry to read about your struggles. Would you be interested in sharing your journey in our upcoming I am #1in6 campaign that we will be running in Feb? If so, please email me on saskia@ifaasa.co.za.

      Reply

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    deby

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    There are affordable options such as adoption. you may need to consider this.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Prayingtobeamommy

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      My husband and I have also been struggling with infertility for 9+ years. On our honeymoon we decided to get pregnant as soon as possible. After 4 years of trying my gynaecologist at the time suggested infertility treatment and recommended a specialist. At first my husband was against fertility treatment for various reasons. After months of nagging him, he gave in and we went for our first consultation. The fertility specialist ran all sorts of blood tests, test to see if I had blocked fallopian tubes, scans, sperm samples etc. He did not find any medical reason what so ever why we can’t fall pregnant naturally. He suggested that we try IUI first. So after 3 unsuccessful IUI’s we were hopeless, he then recommended IVF. We did not have the money so had to postpone the treatment to save money. After months of saving and full of hope we finally had the money and scheduled our first IVF treatment. They could only fertilize 3 of my 8 eggs, the rest was poor quality eggs. The doctor informed us that I have a very low egg count that of a 43 year old, I was 30 at the time. 10 days after the embrio transfer we found out that our round of IVF was unsuccessful and to add to our pain, my brother in-law and his wife called to say they are expecting their first baby. (completely unaware of our pain and treatment). We were heartbroken, angry and sad. So for months I avoided any contact with my pregnant friends and in-laws, I had to grief on my own and for me not having contact with them was the best way. I know it’s not their fault that we are unable to fall pregnant and that I should be happy for them, but I was so jealous. Well, after a few months, my husband and I decided to consider adoption. We contacted a private social worker and started with the screening process and after 6 months we were finally on the waiting list or rather paper pregnant as it’s called in the adoption circles. Almost 3 years have passed and we are still waiting / paper pregnant. People have a misperception of the adoption process, they think it’s cheaper than IVF treatment and that you can just walk in to a children’s home or orphanage and adopted a baby or child, wish it was that simple but unfortunately it’s not. We just entered year 10 of our infertility struggle. It has been one emotional roller-coaster, for a few years all we could talk about was what treatment to do next, how to save money, not to buy this, because it cost too much money, we need to save for IVF. Then we just decided, the hell with that, we are going to start live our life’s and go on all the holidays we could take, do the stuff that people with babies and kids can’t do. That didn’t last long, we are now yet again considering IVF and saving money, this time going to one of the best specialists in SA. You never know, we might get that call from the social worker saying that she has a baby for us at any day or even fall pregnant naturally. This journey sux big time and I would not wish this on anyone.

      Reply

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